Join my tribe!

Sign up to learn how to keep your skills up to date on the tech that matters most and confidently sell your skills to a growing customer base.
I will never spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Reader Interactions

Comments

  1. Although I don’t know all the answers, I’m totally comfortable hanging out in the StudioPress forums and answering questions there, but I haven’t ventured over to the WP forums to contriibute – I started on WP with Genesis, so I know there’s a lot of basic WP stuff that I have no idea how to do without the Genesis framework.

    I agree with you, though – if you have been helped at all in one way or another, you should take some time to give back – you’ll make someone’s day, I’m sure.

    • Susan, you’re a total inspiration! I love that you have helped, but also have encouraged others to do so with your tweets. I’m also much more comfortable in the Genesis forums than with WP, but that’s still a contribution – it doesn’t have to be with “formal” WordPress.org to count. 🙂

  2. Coincidentally, I’ve joined a WordPress meetup group from New York less than a week ago! I’m looking forward attending my very first meeting.

    I have known WP for many years, but only in the last year or two I’ve started to reaaaaaally use it. So much so that it is the first time I’ve built my full website using WP only (not the blog here, info website there, shop over there…).

    As always, your post made me laugh… first at “Brian and Rudy evangelized me in the ways of WordPress.” and then at “Joomla users, that’s who.” lol I have a friend who hates WordPress and adores Joomla. She’d be horrified to hear that!!! And that brought memories, I used to work with Joomla a LOT, I actually start with Mambo (Joomla’s dad) when they didn’t even had Joomla yet… That was around 2005 or so.

    WordPress = Evolution! =D

  3. Great read Carrie! I started a on a very similar path; I knew little of coding or WP best practices, and leaned heavily on the free knowledge of others. I had no knowledge of community at that time. I was just grateful that anything I needed was a Google/forum search away, but thought little beyond that.

    About 2 years in to my business, I began to expand on that thinking. Here I was, making a living off of something that is essentially free (well, that and StudioPress, which is worth every penny!) but doing nothing to give in return. It was my first WordCamp (SF 2011) where I met the community I was just beginning to hear about, and everything from that day forward has changed…

    Today is the 3rd anniversary of my business (no joking) and while I still make money from WordPress, I also now give an increasing amount of my time back as well, in forums, documentation, and even contributions to core, not because it’s “billable hours” but because it’s the best feeling out there. Surprisingly, this free work has only benefitted me, and has really helped me to “level-up” in every regard, both in the larger WP community, and when I invoice my clients. 🙂

    Give to WordPress; what you get back is immeasurable.

  4. Hey Carrie !

    Do you think having a blog to share code snippets and how-to’s for Genesis is good? There seems to be a lot around already, and i feel a bit overwhelmed by it especially as i’m not good at writing.

    But i could just share everything i use and do with Genesis and WordPress, not full articles, but sort of like my own documentation and code.

    • Hey Jamie,
      Have you played with Github at all? It’s a great way to share code bits without the tutorial part. If writing’s not your thing, don’t stress out about it. Stick to sharing the things you’re most comfortable with. Any WordPress Meetups in your city? If not, you could try starting one. 🙂

      Cheers,
      Carrie

    • Hi Jon,
      We encourage each of you to become involved with the community, and assist in the community forums. We review the Genesis Community periodically to select developers and core contributors. While becoming involved in the community is not a guarantee of being invited to participate as a contributor or developer, that is where we have found our current contributors.
      Thanks for your interest in contributing!

  5. I’ve been posting to the WP forums for years here and there. I’ve paid for a few free plugins. I don’t think that makes me an official contributor. But, I like doing it.

  6. Hi Carrie,

    When I read your post about becoming a WP contributor it inspired me to take a chance and start my own WP meetup. I posted the new group in my FB and it attracted 3 members already and one even rsvp’d for our first meeting which was tonight.

    The reason for starting my own group is I wanted it to be closer. The closest WP meetup to me is 120 miles round-trip and I rsvp’d on a number of occasions but as life has it something always comes up causing me to cancel. The reason I want to go to a meetup is because I would like to interact with others who won’t illicit a deer in the head light look when I mention WP or politely say Gesundheit when I say WAPUU.

    I’ve been using WP for a few years now and I feel confident enough that I could help strapped business owners or anyone else who would like to take a stab at building their own blog or website. So besides meeting fellow enthusiasts I want to put my skills to the test.

    But as life has it, something came up tonight and my rsvp cancelled. We’ll see what happens next month.

    Jack

    • That is AWESOME, Jack! Inevitably people will RSVP and cancel (or RSVP and just not show up), but keep at it and people will come. You’re right – it is so nice to have people that understand “geek speak.” Most of my friends get glazed eyes when I talk about work…

Trackbacks

Leave a Reply